Find Available Truck Loads

3 Available Owner Operators in Vermont

OriginTruck TypePayDest. #1Dest. #2NamePhone
BRATTLEBORO, VTVan, , Bob-Patti Contact
waitefild, VTopenopen, LA, lisa Contact
burlington, VTboston, MA, angelo alfeo Contact

Vermont Available Truck Drivers

Work of a Truck Driver

Truck drivers are a constant presence on the Nation’s highways and interstates. They deliver everything from automobiles to canned food. Firms of all kinds rely on trucks to pick up and deliver goods because no other form of transportation can deliver goods door-to-door. Even if some goods travel most of the way by ship, train, or airplane, almost everything is carried by trucks at some point in its journey.

Before leaving the terminal or warehouse, truck drivers check the fuel level and oil in their trucks. They also inspect the trucks to make sure that the brakes, windshield wipers, and lights are working and that a fire extinguisher, flares, and other safety equipment are aboard and in working order. Drivers make sure their cargo is secure and adjust the mirrors so that both sides of the truck are visible from the driver’s seat. Drivers report equipment that is inoperable, missing, or loaded improperly to the dispatcher.

Once under way, drivers must be alert in order to prevent accidents. Drivers can see farther down the road because large trucks seat them higher off the ground than other vehicles. This allows them to see the road ahead and select lanes that are moving more smoothly as well as giving them warning of any dangerous road conditions ahead of them.

The duration of runs vary according to the types of cargo and the destinations. Local drivers may provide daily service for a specific route or region, while other drivers make longer, intercity and interstate deliveries. Interstate and intercity cargo tends to vary from job to job more than local cargo. A driver’s responsibilities and assignments change according to the type of loads transported and their vehicle’s size.

New technologies are changing the way truck drivers work, especially long-distance truck drivers. Satellites and the Global Positioning System link many trucks with their company’s headquarters. Troubleshooting information, directions, weather reports, and other important communications can be instantly relayed to the truck. Drivers can easily communicate with the dispatcher to discuss delivery schedules and courses of action in the event of mechanical problems. The satellite link also allows the dispatcher to track the truck’s location, fuel consumption, and engine performance. Some drivers also work with computerized inventory tracking equipment. It is important for the producer, warehouse, and customer to know their product’s location at all times so they can maintain a high quality of service.

Heavy truck and tractor-trailer drivers operate trucks or vans with a capacity of at least 26,000 pounds Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW). They transport goods including cars, livestock, and other materials in liquid, loose, or packaged form. Many routes are from city to city and cover long distances. Some companies use two drivers on very long runs—one drives while the other sleeps in a berth behind the cab. These “sleeper” runs can last for days, or even weeks. Trucks on sleeper runs typically stop only for fuel, food, loading, and unloading.

Some heavy truck and tractor-trailer drivers who have regular runs transport freight to the same city on a regular basis. Other drivers perform ad hoc runs because shippers request varying service to different cities every day.

The U.S. Department of Transportation requires that drivers keep a log of their activities, the condition of the truck, and the circumstances of any accidents.

Long-distance heavy truck and tractor-trailer drivers spend most of their working time behind the wheel, but also may have to load or unload their cargo. This is especially common when drivers haul specialty cargo, because they may be the only ones at the destination familiar with procedures or certified to handle the materials. Auto-transport drivers, for example, position cars on the trailers at the manufacturing plant and remove them at the dealerships. When picking up or delivering furniture, drivers of long-distance moving vans hire local workers to help them load or unload.

Light or delivery services truck drivers operate vans and trucks weighing less than 26,000 pounds GVW. They pick up or deliver merchandise and packages within a specific area. This may include short “turnarounds” to deliver a shipment to a nearby city, pick up another loaded truck or van, and drive it back to their home base the same day. These services may require use of electronic delivery tracking systems to track the whereabouts of the merchandise or packages. Light or delivery services truck drivers usually load or unload the merchandise at the customer’s place of business. They may have helpers if there are many deliveries to make during the day, or if the load requires heavy moving. Typically, before the driver arrives for work, material handlers load the trucks and arrange items for ease of delivery. Customers must sign receipts for goods and pay drivers the balance due on the merchandise if there is a cash-on-delivery arrangement. At the end of the day drivers turn in receipts, payments, records of deliveries made, and any reports on mechanical problems with their trucks.

Some local truck drivers have sales and customer service responsibilities. The primary responsibility of driver/sales workers, or route drivers, is to deliver and sell their firm’s products over established routes or within an established territory. They sell goods such as food products, including restaurant takeout items, or pick up and deliver items such as laundry. Their response to customer complaints and requests can make the difference between a large order and a lost customer. Route drivers may also take orders and collect payments.

The duties of driver/sales workers vary according to their industry, the policies of their employer, and the emphasis placed on their sales responsibility. Most have wholesale routes that deliver to businesses and stores, rather than to homes. For example, wholesale bakery driver/sales workers deliver and arrange bread, cakes, rolls, and other baked goods on display racks in grocery stores. They estimate how many of each item to stock by paying close attention to what is selling. They may recommend changes in a store’s order or encourage the manager to stock new bakery products. Laundries that rent linens, towels, work clothes, and other items employ driver/sales workers to visit businesses regularly to replace soiled laundry. Their duties also may include soliciting new customers along their sales route.

After completing their route, driver/sales workers place orders for their next deliveries based on product sales and customer requests.

Truck Driver Working Conditions

Truck driving has become less physically demanding because most trucks now have more comfortable seats, better ventilation, and improved, ergonomically designed cabs. Although these changes make the work environment less taxing, driving for many hours at a stretch, loading and unloading cargo, and making many deliveries can be tiring. Local truck drivers, unlike long-distance drivers, usually return home in the evening. Some self-employed long-distance truck drivers who own and operate their trucks spend most of the year away from home.

Design improvements in newer trucks have reduced stress and increased the efficiency of long-distance drivers. Many newer trucks are equipped with refrigerators, televisions, and bunks.

The U.S. Department of Transportation governs work hours and other working conditions of truck drivers engaged in interstate commerce. A long-distance driver may drive for 11 hours and work for up to 14 hours—including driving and non-driving duties—after having 10 hours off-duty. A driver may not drive after having worked for 60 hours in the past 7 days or 70 hours in the past 8 days unless they have taken at least 34 consecutive hours off-duty. Most drivers are required to document their time in a logbook. Many drivers, particularly on long runs, work close to the maximum time permitted because they typically are compensated according to the number of miles or hours they drive. Drivers on long runs face boredom, loneliness, and fatigue. Drivers often travel nights, holidays, and weekends to avoid traffic delays.

Local truck drivers frequently work 50 or more hours a week. Drivers who handle food for chain grocery stores, produce markets, or bakeries typically work long hours—starting late at night or early in the morning. Although most drivers have regular routes, some have different routes each day. Many local truck drivers, particularly driver/sales workers, load and unload their own trucks. This requires considerable lifting, carrying, and walking each day.

State and Federal regulations govern the qualifications and standards for truck drivers. All drivers must comply with Federal regulations and any State regulations that are in excess of those Federal requirements. Truck drivers must have a driver’s license issued by the State in which they live, and most employers require a clean driving record. Drivers of trucks designed to carry 26,000 pounds or more—including most tractor-trailers, as well as bigger straight trucks—must obtain a commercial driver’s license (CDL) from the State in which they live. All truck drivers who operate trucks transporting hazardous materials must obtain a CDL, regardless of truck size. In order to receive the hazardous materials endorsement a driver must be fingerprinted and submit to a criminal background check by the Transportation Security Administration. Federal regulations governing CDL administration allow for States to exempt farmers, emergency medical technicians, firefighters, some military drivers, and snow and ice removers from the need for a CDL at the State’s discretion. In many States a regular driver’s license is sufficient for driving light trucks and vans.

To qualify for a CDL an applicant must have a clean driving record, pass a written test on rules and regulations, and then demonstrate that they can operate a commercial truck safely. A national database permanently records all driving violations committed by those with a CDL. A State will check these records and deny a CDL to those who already have a license suspended or revoked in another State. Licensed drivers must accompany trainees until they get their own CDL. A person may not hold more than one license at a time and must surrender any other licenses when a CDL is issued. Information on how to apply for a CDL may be obtained from State motor vehicle administrations.

Many States allow those who are as young as 18 years old to drive trucks within their borders. To drive a commercial vehicle between States one must be 21 years of age, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT), which establishes minimum qualifications for truck drivers engaging in interstate commerce. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations—published by U.S. DOT—require drivers to be at least 21 years old and to pass a physical examination once every 2 years. The main physical requirements include good hearing, at least 20/40 vision with glasses or corrective lenses, and a 70-degree field of vision in each eye. Drivers may not be colorblind. Drivers must be able to hear a forced whisper in one ear at not less than 5 feet, with a hearing aid if needed. Drivers must have normal use of arms and legs and normal blood pressure. Drivers may not use any controlled substances, unless prescribed by a licensed physician. Persons with epilepsy or diabetes controlled by insulin are not permitted to be interstate truck drivers. Federal regulations also require employers to test their drivers for alcohol and drug use as a condition of employment, and require periodic random tests of the drivers while they are on duty. A driver must not have been convicted of a felony involving the use of a motor vehicle; a crime involving drugs; driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol; refusing to submit to an alcohol test required by a State or its implied consent laws or regulations; leaving the scene of a crime; or causing a fatality through negligent operation of a motor vehicle. All drivers must be able to read and speak English well enough to read road signs, prepare reports, and communicate with law enforcement officers and the public.

Many trucking operations have higher standards than those described here. Many firms require that drivers be at least 22 years old, be able to lift heavy objects, and have driven trucks for 3 to 5 years. Many prefer to hire high school graduates and require annual physical examinations. Companies have an economic incentive to hire less risky drivers, as good drivers use less fuel and cost less to insure.

Taking driver-training courses is a desirable method of preparing for truck driving jobs and for obtaining a CDL. High school courses in driver training and automotive mechanics also may be helpful. Many private and public vocational-technical schools offer tractor-trailer driver training programs. Students learn to maneuver large vehicles on crowded streets and in highway traffic. They also learn to inspect trucks and freight for compliance with regulations. Some programs provide only a limited amount of actual driving experience. Completion of a program does not guarantee a job. Those interested in attending a driving school should check with local trucking companies to make sure the school’s training is acceptable. Some States require prospective drivers to complete a training course in basic truck driving before being issued their CDL. The Professional Truck Driver Institute (PTDI), a nonprofit organization established by the trucking industry, manufacturers, and others, certifies driver training courses at truck driver training schools that meet industry standards and Federal Highway Administration guidelines for training tractor-trailer drivers.

Drivers must get along well with people because they often deal directly with customers. Employers seek driver/sales workers who speak well and have self-confidence, initiative, tact, and a neat appearance. Employers also look for responsible, self-motivated individuals who are able to work well with little supervision.

Training given to new drivers by employers is usually informal, and may consist of only a few hours of instruction from an experienced driver, sometimes on the new employee’s own time. New drivers may also ride with and observe experienced drivers before getting their own assignments. Drivers receive additional training to drive special types of trucks or handle hazardous materials. Some companies give 1 to 2 days of classroom instruction covering general duties, the operation and loading of a truck, company policies, and the preparation of delivery forms and company records. Driver/sales workers also receive training on the various types of products their company carries so that they can effectively answer questions about the products and more easily market them to their customers.

Although most new truck drivers are assigned to regular driving jobs immediately, some start as extra drivers—substituting for regular drivers who are ill or on vacation. Extra drivers receive a regular assignment when an opening occurs.

New drivers sometimes start on panel trucks or other small straight trucks. As they gain experience and show competent driving skills they may advance to larger, heavier trucks and finally to tractor-trailers.

The advancement of truck drivers generally is limited to driving runs that provide increased earnings, preferred schedules, or working conditions. Local truck drivers may advance to driving heavy or specialized trucks, or transfer to long-distance truck driving. Working for companies that also employ long-distance drivers is the best way to advance to these positions. Few truck drivers become dispatchers or managers.

Some long-distance truck drivers purchase trucks and go into business for themselves. Although some of these owner-operators are successful, others fail to cover expenses and go out of business. Owner-operators should have good business sense as well as truck driving experience. Courses in accounting, business, and business mathematics are helpful. Knowledge of truck mechanics can enable owner-operators to perform their own routine maintenance and minor repairs.


ADAMANT, 5640 ALBANY, 5820 ALBURG, 5440 ARLINGTON, 5250 ASCUTNEY, 5030 AVERILL, 5901 BAKERSFIELD, 5441 BARNARD, 5031 BARNET, 5821 BARRE, 5641 BARRETT, 5070 BARTON, 5822 BEEBE PLAIN, 5823 BEECHER FALLS, 5902 BELLOWS FALLS, 5101 BELMONT, 5730 BELVIDERE CENTER, 5442 BENNINGTON, 5201 BENSON, 5731 BETHEL, 5032 Birmingham, 5647 BOMOSEEN, 5732 BONDVILLE, 5340 BRADFORD, 5033 BRANDON, 5733 BRATTLEBORO, 5301 BRIDGEWATER, 5034 BRIDGEWATER CORNERS, 5035 BRIDPORT, 5734 BRISTOL, 5443 BROOKFIELD, 5036 BROWNSVILLE, 5037 BURLINGTON, 5401 CABOT, 5647 CALAIS, 5648 CAMBRIDGE, 5444 CAMBRIDGEPORT, 5141 CANAAN, 5903 CASTLETON, 5735 CAVENDISH, 5142 CENTER RUTLAND, 5736 CHARLOTTE, 5445 CHELSEA, 5038 CHESTER, 5143 CHESTER DEPOT, 5144 CHITTENDEN, 5737 COLCHESTER, 5439 CONCORD, 5824 CORINTH, 5039 COVENTRY, 5825 CRAFTSBURY, 5826 CRAFTSBURY COMMON, 5827 CUTTINGSVILLE, 5738 DANBY, 5739 DANVILLE, 5828 DERBY, 5829 DERBY LINE, 5830 DORSET, 5251 E Middlebury, 5740 EAST ARLINGTON, 5252 EAST BARRE, 5649 EAST BERKSHIRE, 5447 EAST BURKE, 5832 EAST CALAIS, 5650 EAST CHARLESTON, 5833 EAST CORINTH, 5040 EAST DORSET, 5253 EAST DOVER, 5341 EAST FAIRFIELD, 5448 EAST HARDWICK, 5836 EAST HAVEN, 5837 EAST MIDDLEBURY, 5740 EAST MONTPELIER, 5651 EAST POULTNEY, 5741 EAST RANDOLPH, 5041 EAST RYEGATE, 5042 EAST SAINT JOHNSBURY, 5838 EAST THETFORD, 5043 EAST WALLINGFORD, 5742 EDEN, 5652 EDEN MILLS, 5653 Ely, 5045 ENOSBURG FALLS, 5450 ESSEX, 5451 ESSEX JUNCTION, 5452 FAIR HAVEN, 5743 FAIRFAX, 5454 FAIRFIELD, 5455 FAIRLEE, 5045 FERRISBURG, 5456 FLORENCE, 5744 FOREST DALE, 5745 FRANKLIN, 5457 GAYSVILLE, 5746 GEORGIA, 5478 GILMAN, 5904 GLOVER, 5839 GRAFTON, 5146 GRANBY, 5840 GRAND ISLE, 5458 GRANITEVILLE, 5654 GRANVILLE, 5747 GREENSBORO, 5841 GREENSBORO BEND, 5842 GROTON, 5046 GUILDHALL, 5905 HANCOCK, 5748 HARDWICK, 5843 HARTFORD, 5047 HARTLAND, 5048 HARTLAND FOUR CORNERS, 5049 HIGHGATE CENTER, 5459 HIGHGATE SPRINGS, 5460 HINESBURG, 5461 HUNTINGTON, 5462 HYDE PARK, 5655 HYDEVILLE, 5750 IRASBURG, 5845 ISLAND POND, 5846 ISLE LA MOTTE, 5463 JACKSONVILLE, 5342 JAMAICA, 5343 JAY, 5859 JEFFERSONVILLE, 5464 JERICHO, 5465 JOHNSON, 5656 JONESVILLE, 5466 KILLINGTON, 5751 LAKE ELMORE, 5657 LONDONDERRY, 5148 LOWELL, 5847 LOWER WATERFORD, 5848 LUDLOW, 5149 LUNENBURG, 5906 LYNDON, 5849 LYNDON CENTER, 5850 LYNDONVILLE, 5851 MANCHESTER, 5254 MANCHESTER CENTER, 5255 Manchester Ctr, 5255 MANCHESTR CENTER, 5255 MARLBORO, 5344 MARSHFIELD, 5658 MC INDOE FALLS, 5050 MIDDLEBURY, 5753 MIDDLESEX, 5602 MIDDLETOWN SPRINGS, 5757 MILTON, 5468 MONKTON, 5469 MONTGOMERY, 5470 MONTGOMERY CENTER, 5471 MONTPELIER, 5601 MORETOWN, 5660 MORGAN, 5853 MORGAN HL, 5161 MORRISVILLE, 5661 MOSCOW, 5662 MOUNT HOLLY, 5758 Mt Holly, 5758 N Clarendon, 0 N SPRINGFIELD, 5150 New Boston, 5075 NEW HAVEN, 5472 NEWBURY, 5051 NEWFANE, 5345 NEWPORT, 5855 NEWPORT CENTER, 5857 NORTH BENNINGTON, 5257 NORTH CLARENDON, 5759 NORTH CONCORD, 5858 NORTH FERRISBURG, 5473 NORTH HARTLAND, 5052 NORTH HERO, 5474 NORTH HYDE PARK, 5665 NORTH MONTPELIER, 5666 NORTH POMFRET, 5053 NORTH POWNAL, 5260 NORTH SPRINGFI, 5150 NORTH SPRINGFIELD, 5150 NORTH THETFORD, 5054 NORTH TROY, 5859 NORTHFIELD, 5663 NORTHFIELD FALLS, 5664 NORTON, 5907 NORWICH, 5055 ORLEANS, 5860 ORWELL, 5760 PASSUMPSIC, 5861 PAWLET, 5761 PEACHAM, 5862 PERKINSVILLE, 5151 PERU, 5152 PITTSFIELD, 5762 PITTSFORD, 5763 PLAINFIELD, 5667 PLYMOUTH, 5056 POST MILLS, 5058 POULTNEY, 5764 POWNAL, 5261 PROCTOR, 5765 PROCTORSVILLE, 5153 PUTNEY, 5346 QUECHEE, 5059 RANDOLPH, 5060 RANDOLPH CENTER, 5061 READING, 5062 READSBORO, 5350 RICHFORD, 5476 RICHMOND, 5477 RIPTON, 5766 ROCHESTER, 5767 ROUND MTN, 5905 ROXBURY, 5669 RUPERT, 5768 RUTLAND, 5701 S BURLINGTON, 5401 SAINT ALBANS, 5478 SAINT ALBANS BAY, 5481 SAINT JOHNSBURY, 5819 SAINT JOHNSBURY CENTER, 5863 SALISBURY, 5769 SAXTONS RIVER, 5154 SHAFTSBURY, 5262 SHARON, 5065 SHEFFIELD, 5866 SHELBURNE, 5482 SHELDON, 5483 SHELDON SPRINGS, 5485 SHOREHAM, 5770 SOUTH BARRE, 5670 SOUTH BURLINGTON, 5403 SOUTH HERO, 5486 SOUTH LONDONDERRY, 5155 SOUTH NEWFANE, 5351 SOUTH POMFRET, 5067 SOUTH ROYALTON, 5068 SOUTH RYEGATE, 5069 SOUTH STRAFFORD, 5070 South Windham, 5359 SOUTH WOODSTOCK, 5071 SPRINGFIELD, 5156 ST ALBANS, 5478 St Johnsbury, 0 STAMFORD, 5352 STARKSBORO, 5487 STOCKBRIDGE, 5772 STOWE, 5672 STRAFFORD, 5072 SUTTON, 5867 SWANTON, 5488 TAFTSVILLE, 5073 THETFORD, 5074 THETFORD CENTER, 5075 TOWNSHEND, 5353 TROY, 5868 TUNBRIDGE, 5077 UNDERHILL, 5489 UNDERHILL CENTER, 5490 VALLEY VIEW, 5701 VERGENNES, 5491 VERNON, 5354 VERSHIRE, 5079 WAITSFIELD, 5673 WALLINGFORD, 5773 WARDSBORO, 5355 WARREN, 5674 WASHINGTON, 5675 WATERBURY, 5671 WATERBURY CENTER, 5677 WATERVILLE, 5492 WEBSTERVILLE, 5678 WELLS, 5774 WELLS RIVER, 5081 WEST BURKE, 5871 WEST CHARLESTON, 5872 WEST DANVILLE, 5873 WEST DOVER, 5356 WEST DUMMERSTON, 5357 WEST FAIRLEE, 5083 WEST GLOVER, 5875 WEST HALIFAX, 5358 WEST HARTFORD, 5084 WEST NEWBURY, 5085 WEST PAWLET, 5775 WEST RUPERT, 5776 WEST RUTLAND, 5777 WEST TOPSHAM, 5086 WEST TOWNSHEND, 5359 WEST WARDSBORO, 5360 WESTFIELD, 5874 WESTFORD, 5494 WESTMINSTER, 5158 WESTMINSTER STATION, 5159 WESTON, 5161 White River Jc, 0 WHITE RIVER JUNCTION, 5001 WHITING, 5778 WHITINGHAM, 5361 WILDER, 5088 WILLIAMSTOWN, 5679 WILLIAMSVILLE, 5362 WILLISTON, 5495 WILMINGTON, 5363 WINDSOR, 5089 WINOOSKI, 5404 WOLCOTT, 5680 WOODBURY, 5681 WOODSTOCK, 5091 WORCESTER, 5682